Manufacturers

Manufacturer News: 1.10.2012

EV Roundup

Charging Suppliers

ECOtality works with Kohl’s & Outcast: ECOtality will install 42 of its Blink EV chargers at 14 Kohl’s locations nationwide in a pilot program. Working with Outcast, the company will “launch a digital network at Blink EV charging stations.” Outcast provides a TV network at gasoline pumps. Screens will range in size from seven to 42 inches.

Evatran goes with Sears: Evatran, maker of “Plugless Power” wireless EV charging stations, has teamed up with Sears Home Services, the installation arm of the retailer.

Future of EVs & charging: Michael Farkas, CEO of Car Charging Group, sat for an interview with Investor Ideas. In the interview, Farkas said,  “I see little or no role in the government moving forward. I believe that incentives and grants will be eliminated in their entirety. I think the 30% tax credit will be gone. This is not a concern for us as we believe the market is embracing electric vehicles in its own right. We do not believe in government financial support of any industry but while it is available we are happy to take advantage of it.”

Separately, Car Charging Group said it has partnered with Federal Realty Investment Trust to install EV chargers “in strategically selected metropolitan markets in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and California.”

EV Users

IKEA: With the addition of four Blink charging stations in Covina, Calif., the retailer has now completed five EV charging projects in the United States.

Michigan: According to a report in Crain’s Detroit Business, ChargeNowLLC of Auburn Hills “has installed more than 200 [EV charging stations (in MI) since October 2010.” The report covered the Milford Parking Authority’s demonstration of the new stations on Dec. 15.

Other News

EV “fueling” stations more numerous than flex fuel: According to a Gas2.org posting, “According to Bloomberg study, there are 4,448 public EV charging stations spread out across the U.S., serving about 16,500 ‘highway worthy’ EV’s. They’re probably discounting the thousands of homemade EV’s, but whatever. That’s a ratio of 3.7 EV’s for every charging station.

“Now compare that to the 2,468 E85 ethanol stations serving over 7.6 million flex fuel vehicles in America. That’s…a lot more cars, and a lot fewer filling stations. Most of these stations are clustered around the MidWest.”

EVITP program recognized: The DOE’s Clean Cities program recognized the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program as a Clean Cities Partner, according to a NECA news release.

Vehicles

All-electric cargo van: According to the Star-Tribune, Hennepin County, Minn. will use an all-electric cargo van—a Ford Transit Connect model—“to deliver interoffice mail, part of an effort by the Drive Electric Minnesota partnership to promote EV technology.”

Nissan Leaf to power your home? A report on a UK website says, “According to Nissan, the Leaf’s 24kW per hour battery is enough to power a home’s lights, fan, television, fridge and other appliances for two days. In an ideal world, the technology would operate in a smart home fitted with solar panels and fuel cells, thus free from the electrical grid.” The list price on the car-to-house system, set to go on sale in a few months in Japan, would reportedly be around $6,000.

Opel delays Ampera: The European version of the Chevy Volt is the Opel Ampera. Due to reported problems GM had with the Volt’s batteries and fires, the NY Times reported, Opel was not selling any. The article said the models in Europe “will sit in showrooms.”

Smith/Frito-Lay: Smith Electric Vehicles makes delivery trucks that reportedly get 100 miles on a single charge. According to EnvironmentalLeader.com, Frito-Lay North America (unit, Pepsico) will use eight of these in the Boston area.

Toyota/China: In late December, Toyota Tsusho said it will partner with two Chinese companies to develop EV charging infrastructure in China. Tsusho is the auto-parts company associated with auto-maker Toyota. The partnering companies are Potevio and Chongging Chanpeng.

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